Peer to peer file sharing

You should not normally use peer-to-peer software on the University network or computers.

If you need to use it for University business, it must be registered with the IT Help Desk. If you need any advice, please contact the IT Help Desk.

Policy

The University's Software Usage & Control Policy states that " Peer-to-peer file sharing software must not be present on any device (whether University owned or privately owned) which is physically connected (as distinct from remotely connected) to the University campus network unless its use is intended for official University purposes and it has first been formally registered with IT." You can find the procedure of registering such devices on the Systems Security and Network Access and Management Policy.

What is file sharing peer-to-peer software?

Peer-to-peer software is used for sharing computer files with other users over the Internet. It is often used to share films, music, software and electronic publications in breach of the producers' copyright. It can also be used (or mis-configured) to share other computer files and as such it represents a potential security risk.

The most common peer-to-peer file sharing applications are:

  • Ares;
  • Audiogalaxy;
  • BitTorrent
  • BearShare;
  • eDonkey;
  • Gnutella;
  • Kazaa; and
  • LimeWire.

Other common file sharing applications are:

ABC, Acquisition, Adagio, Aimini network, Aimini P2P, Altnet, Amicima, aMule, ANts P2P, Applejuice, Ares, Ares Galaxy, AsagumoWeb, Audiogalaxy, Avalanche, Azureus, BCDC++, BearShare, BetBug, BitComet, BitSpirit, BitTornado, Blubster, Bullguard, ByteTornado, Cabos, CAKE, Caribou, Carracho, Chord, Condor, CoolStreaming, Coral, CSpace, Cybersky-TV, DC++, Dijjer, Direct Connect network, EarthStation5, eDonkey, eDonkey network, eDonkey2000, eDonkey2000, eMule, Entropy, FastTrack, FileScope, FileTopia, FotoSwap, FreeCast, Freenet, FrostWire, giFT, Globus, Gnucleus, GNUnet, GNUnet-gtk, Gnutella, Gnutella2, Grokster, gtk-gnutella, Hamachi, IceShare, iFolder, iGlance, IRC, iSwipe, Joltid, Joltid PeerEnabler, JXTA, Kad Network, Kademlia, Kazaa, Kazaa Lite, KCeasy, Kiwi Alpha, konspire2b, Legion, LimeWire, LiveP2P, LMule, Madster/Aimster, Mammoth, MANOLITO/MP2P, MFPnet, MLDonkey, mlMac, Mnet, MojoNation, Morpheus, MUTE, Napigator, , NeoModus Direct Connect, Networks, Octoshape, OmilyX, OnionRouter, OpenExt, OpenFT, OpenNap, Overnet, PeerCast, Peercasting, Peersites, P-Grid, Phex, Piolet, PixVillage, Poisoned, Qnext, RockItNet, Scour, Shareaza, Solipsis, soribada, Soulseek, SPIN, StrongDC++, Swapper, Swarmcast, The Circle, Transmission, Tribler, TrustyFiles, Usenet, Warez P2P, WASTE, WinMX, Winny, WinZO, WPNP, xMule, XoloX, ZEPP and Zultrax.

However, this list is not exhaustive. If you have any application on a device which is not listed above, but which you think may constitute file sharing peer-to-peer software, please contact the IT Help Desk for advice.

None of the applications listed above are to be present on any device (whether privately or University owned) unless they are to be used for official University purposes and the device has been registered with ISS. The University will monitor the network for the presence of any of these applications and anyone found to be breaching the policy may be dealt with in accordance with University procedures.

Applications that do not need to be registered

The following applications (not exhaustive) use peer-to-peer technology but are not classed as file sharing applications in the true sense. As such, they do not require to be registered with ISS:

  • BBC iPlayer;
  • Channel 4 4oD;
  • Kontiki;
  • iMesh;
  • ITV Player;
  • iTunes;
  • Media players;
  • Microsoft Live Mesh ;
  • Napster;
  • Skype;
  • Spotify;
  • Windows Live Messenger;
  • Yahoo Messenger; and
  • AOL Messenger.

If you have any application on a device which is not listed above, but which you think may constitute peer-to-peer software which does not need registering, please contact the IT Help Desk for advice.

Remote access to the campus network using a privately owned device

University data could be inadvertently exposed if users access the campus network remotely and their device contains mis-configured peer-to-peer software, although there is no risk if the remote access is via the University's Desktop Anywhere (also known as CITRIX).

If you access the campus network remotely using a privately owned device by means other than Desktop Anywhere, and file sharing peer-to-peer software is running on your device, please take extra care to ensure that it will not share University data or advertise the availability of it for sharing. If you are not sure how to do this please check with your local IT support staff or the IT Help Desk.

Getting Help

If you have file sharing peer-to-peer software on a device that physically connects to the campus network and which you have to remove because it is not required for official University purposes, but you do not know how to do this, you should contact either you local IT support staff or the IT Help Desk, as applicable, for advice.

If you have any application on a device which is not listed above, but which you think may constitute peer-to-peer software, please contact the IT Help Desk for advice.